Peregrine Falcon

Falco peregrinus

The peregrine falcon is known for its hunting speed, which after gaining height can reach up to 200 mph.

This falcon hunts smaller birds by ‘punching’ the birds during a dive with its tightly clenched talons. It is also a swift and agile bird, adept at chasing prey and able to adapt its hunting technique to different species. Peregrine falcons are blue-grey in colour, with a white face, black moustache and a speckled chest. They pair for life and nest on rocky ledges, such as cliffs or quarries.

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Discover more about the Peregrine Falcon

All year round

Binoculars Icon Blue
When to see

The best time of year to see this bird in larger numbers is during the breeding season in spring, when males are ‘lekking’ on a clear area along a woodland edge. Up to ten males may be seen at one time and females visit the lek site to choose a male to mate with. When larch trees have their first flush of growth, black grouse are sometimes seen feeding on the fresh needles. Birch catkins are also a very attractive food to them.

Map Icon Blue
Where to see

Throughout Scotland

Binoculars Icon Blue
When to see

The best time of year to see this bird in larger numbers is during the breeding season in spring, when males are ‘lekking’ on a clear area along a woodland edge. Up to ten males may be seen at one time and females visit the lek site to choose a male to mate with. When larch trees have their first flush of growth, black grouse are sometimes seen feeding on the fresh needles. Birch catkins are also a very attractive food to them.

Map Icon Blue
Where to see

Throughout Scotland

Binoculars Icon Blue
When to see

The best time of year to see this bird in larger numbers is during the breeding season in spring, when males are ‘lekking’ on a clear area along a woodland edge. Up to ten males may be seen at one time and females visit the lek site to choose a male to mate with. When larch trees have their first flush of growth, black grouse are sometimes seen feeding on the fresh needles. Birch catkins are also a very attractive food to them.

Map Icon Blue
Where to see

Throughout Scotland