Red Kite

Milvus Milvus

Red kites are easily identified by their large size (wingspan of almost 2m), reddish-brown colourings and deeply forked tail.

A successful re-introduction programme has resulted in the birds becoming increasingly common in the Black Isle (near Inverness) and the Trossachs.

Kites feed on predominantly on carrion, although will also take small mammals and worms. They are often seen hovering near roadsides looking for road kill.

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Discover more about the Red Kite

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When to see

Can be seen throughout the year.

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Where to see

Widespread

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Did you know?

They often use colourful, shiny objects in their nests. The call of the Red Kite has a distinctive “mewing” sound. Reintroduction programmes have been key to increasing the numbers of red kites in Scotland. Programmes in Perthshire and Dumfries and Galloway have been particularly successful.

Binoculars Icon Blue
When to see

Can be seen throughout the year.

Map Icon Blue
Where to see

Widespread

Book Icon Blue
Did you know?

They often use colourful, shiny objects in their nests. The call of the Red Kite has a distinctive “mewing” sound. Reintroduction programmes have been key to increasing the numbers of red kites in Scotland. Programmes in Perthshire and Dumfries and Galloway have been particularly successful.

Binoculars Icon Blue
When to see

Can be seen throughout the year.

Map Icon Blue
Where to see

Widespread

Book Icon Blue
Did you know?

They often use colourful, shiny objects in their nests. The call of the Red Kite has a distinctive “mewing” sound. Reintroduction programmes have been key to increasing the numbers of red kites in Scotland. Programmes in Perthshire and Dumfries and Galloway have been particularly successful.