Kestrel

Falco tinnunculus

A familiar sight with its pointed wings and long tail, hovering beside a roadside verge.

 Numbers of kestrels declined in the 1970s, probably as a result of changes in farming and so it is included on the Amber List. They have adapted readily to man-made environments and can survive right in the centre of cities.

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Discover more about the Kestrel

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When to see

The best time of year to see this bird in larger numbers is during the breeding season in spring, when males are ‘lekking’ on a clear area along a woodland edge. Up to ten males may be seen at one time and females visit the lek site to choose a male to mate with. When larch trees have their first flush of growth, black grouse are sometimes seen feeding on the fresh needles. Birch catkins are also a very attractive food to them.

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Where to see

Resident all the year round and found throughout Scotland, this is a bird of the woodland and moorland edge, but can be seen on farmland bordering woodland. Males are much more visible than females at a distance. The Cairngorms National Park is a particularly good area to see black grouse.

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Did you know?

This bird has declined in areas of intensive agriculture, but has responded well to sympathetic woodland and farmland management on a number of traditional estates and where deer numbers have been reduced in areas of the National Forest. Chick survival rates are predominantly affected over the critical first few weeks after hatching, because of deaths caused by wetter early summer periods due to climate change.

Binoculars Icon Blue
When to see

The best time of year to see this bird in larger numbers is during the breeding season in spring, when males are ‘lekking’ on a clear area along a woodland edge. Up to ten males may be seen at one time and females visit the lek site to choose a male to mate with. When larch trees have their first flush of growth, black grouse are sometimes seen feeding on the fresh needles. Birch catkins are also a very attractive food to them.

Map Icon Blue
Where to see

Resident all the year round and found throughout Scotland, this is a bird of the woodland and moorland edge, but can be seen on farmland bordering woodland. Males are much more visible than females at a distance. The Cairngorms National Park is a particularly good area to see black grouse.

Book Icon Blue
Did you know?

This bird has declined in areas of intensive agriculture, but has responded well to sympathetic woodland and farmland management on a number of traditional estates and where deer numbers have been reduced in areas of the National Forest. Chick survival rates are predominantly affected over the critical first few weeks after hatching, because of deaths caused by wetter early summer periods due to climate change.

Binoculars Icon Blue
When to see

The best time of year to see this bird in larger numbers is during the breeding season in spring, when males are ‘lekking’ on a clear area along a woodland edge. Up to ten males may be seen at one time and females visit the lek site to choose a male to mate with. When larch trees have their first flush of growth, black grouse are sometimes seen feeding on the fresh needles. Birch catkins are also a very attractive food to them.

Map Icon Blue
Where to see

Resident all the year round and found throughout Scotland, this is a bird of the woodland and moorland edge, but can be seen on farmland bordering woodland. Males are much more visible than females at a distance. The Cairngorms National Park is a particularly good area to see black grouse.

Book Icon Blue
Did you know?

This bird has declined in areas of intensive agriculture, but has responded well to sympathetic woodland and farmland management on a number of traditional estates and where deer numbers have been reduced in areas of the National Forest. Chick survival rates are predominantly affected over the critical first few weeks after hatching, because of deaths caused by wetter early summer periods due to climate change.